Giovanni Bellini

Painters of the Venetian Renaissance are best known for their monumental altarpieces, narrative and mythological canvases, and intimate works for private devotion. Many of the same masters engaged in the ornamental arts as well, painting panels for integration into beds, chests, musical instruments, and doors. Susannah Rutherglen describes this less familiar genre, traces the fortunes of surviving artifacts, and discusses their themes, styles, and relevance to the history of Italian Renaissance art.

In the spring of 2010 Bellini’s St. Francis in the Desert underwent an unprecedented technical study at The Metropolitan Museum of Art that incorporated infrared reflectography, X-radiography, surface examination, and paint analysis. The results, which are presented in this lecture by Charlotte Hale, expand our understanding of the evolution and history of this spectacular, enigmatic painting. This lecture was made possible by the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation.

In Bellini’s great masterpiece, the traditional relationship of figure to setting has been reversed, thus engaging us in a way that transforms our experience of the picture and our understanding of the artist’s creative genius. Keith Christiansen will discuss the impetus behind this transformation and its implications for interpreting the picture’s much-discussed subject. This lecture was made possible by the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation.

A brief introduction to Giovanni Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert with Colin B. Bailey, Associate Director, and Peter Jay Sharp, Chief Curator of The Frick Collection.

This silent video about Giovanni Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert was created by Susannah Rutherglen, Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at The Frick Collection, in conjunction with the Frick's New Media Specialist, Lisa Candage, and Metropolitan Museum of Art Paintings Conservator Charlotte Hale, who oversaw the recent technical study. Five videos were produced for the Frick's exhibition, In a New Light: Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert, which was on view from May 22 through August 28, 2011.

This silent video about Giovanni Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert was created by Susannah Rutherglen, Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at The Frick Collection, in conjunction with the Frick's New Media Specialist, Lisa Candage, and Metropolitan Museum of Art Paintings Conservator Charlotte Hale, who oversaw the recent technical study. Five videos were produced for the Frick's exhibition, In a New Light: Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert, which was on view from May 22 through August 28, 2011.

This silent video about Giovanni Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert was created by Susannah Rutherglen, Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at The Frick Collection, in conjunction with the Frick's New Media Specialist, Lisa Candage, and Metropolitan Museum of Art Paintings Conservator Charlotte Hale, who oversaw the recent technical study. Five videos were produced for the Frick's exhibition, In a New Light: Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert, which was on view from May 22 through August 28, 2011.

This silent video about Giovanni Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert was created by Susannah Rutherglen, Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at The Frick Collection, in conjunction with the Frick's New Media Specialist, Lisa Candage, and Metropolitan Museum of Art Paintings Conservator Charlotte Hale, who oversaw the recent technical study. Five videos were produced for the Frick's exhibition, In a New Light: Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert, which was on view from May 22 through August 28, 2011.

This silent video about Giovanni Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert was created by Susannah Rutherglen, Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at The Frick Collection, in conjunction with the Frick's New Media Specialist, Lisa Candage, and Metropolitan Museum of Art Paintings Conservator Charlotte Hale, who oversaw the recent technical study. Five videos were produced for the Frick's exhibition, In a New Light: Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert, which was on view from May 22 through August 28, 2011.

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