2006

Exhibitions presented at The Frick Collection during 2006.

Paul Cézanne (1839 – 1906), Bouilloire et Fruits (Pitcher and Fruit)

June 24, 2006 to June 24, 2007

A magnificent late still life painting by Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) entitled Bouilloire et Fruits (Pitcher and Fruit)  was lent from a private collection and remained on view in the North Hall for approximately one year. Painted around 1888-90, it hung with other Impressionist and post-Impressionist works in The Frick Collection including Claude Monet'sVétheuil in Winter and Edgar Degas's recently cleaned Rehearsal, both dating from 1878-79. The Cézanne loan coincided with the 100th anniversary of the artist's death on October 22, 1906.

Goya’s Last Works

February 22, 2006 to May 14, 2006

Goya’s understated portrait of the woman known as María Martínez de Puga, acquired by Henry Clay Frick in 1914, was the inspiration for The Frick Collection’s special exhibition Goya’s Last Works. It was the first show in the United States to concentrate exclusively on the final phase of Goya’s long career — the years of the artist’s voluntary exile in Bordeaux from 1824 to 1828. Fifty-one examples of Goya’s final production were borrowed from public and private European and North American collections.

Veronese’s Allegories: Virtue, Love, and Exploration in Renaissance Venice

April 11, 2006 to July 16, 2006 The art of Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) is inextricably linked to the idea of opulence and splendor in Renaissance Venice. His paintings are grandiose visions of the richness and spectacle of sixteenth-century Venetian life. Crowded compositions with theatrical effects, in which groups of sumptuously dressed people re-enact religious and secular events, have become synonymous with Veronese’s oeuvre, and his dazzling and effective use of color has been praised and celebrated over the centuries.

Jean-Étienne Liotard (1702-89): Swiss Master

June 13, 2006 to September 17, 2006

The Frick continued to add to its holdings, and the 1997 gift of a painting inspired a major 2006 exhibition on the artist Jean-Étienne Liotard (1702-1789). This presentation offerd the public a singular opportunity to become better acquainted with one of the most original and engaging artists of eighteenth-century Europe, who enjoyed an international reputation in his day, often painting portraits of monarchs and their children in London, Vienna, Parma, and Amsterdam.

Gardens of Eternal Spring: Two Mughal Carpets in The Frick Collection

July 25, 2006 to October 1, 2006 The two magnificent carpets on display in the Oval Room beginning July 25 were among the fewer than five hundred that survive from the court of the Mughal emperors. Woven in northern India in the mid-seventeenth century, these carpets were luxurious objects in terms of both the fabrics used to make them (silk and cashmere) and the artistically complex patterns that they display. The Frick carpets date from the reign of Shah Jahan (1628–1658) and were probably made at the royal factory in Lahore, one of India’s main cities for carpet production.

Cimabue and Early Italian Devotional Painting

October 3, 2006 to December 31, 2006

Six years ago, The Frick Collection’s Flagellation of Christ was confirmed to be by the artist Cenni di Pepo (c. 1240–c. 1302), known as Cimabue, following the discovery ofThe Virgin and Child Enthroned with Two Angels (now in the National Gallery, London), a panel known to have been painted by the Florentine master.

Masterpieces of European Painting from The Cleveland Museum of Art

November 8, 2006 to January 28, 2007 For many years, The Frick Collection has offered its visitors the chance to view important Old Master paintings from American institutions outside the New York area. In keeping with this tradition, the Frick presented fourteen extraordinary works from the renowned Cleveland Museum of Art. Ranging in date from the early Renaissance to the mid-nineteenth century, the selection included canvases by artists represented in the Frick’s permanent collection alongside paintings by important masters not typically seen at the museum.