Complete Checklist

The order of the works in the checklist corresponds loosely to their arrangement in the exhibition.

Complete Checklist (click for larger images)

Claude Monet (1840–1926) 
The Port at Touques, c. 1864
Black chalk on blued white laid paper
8 1/4 x 13 in. (21 x 33 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 2006.5


In this early work, Monet sketched this close-up view of a fishing village in Normandy in bright daylight. 

Claude Monet (1840–1926) 
View of Rouen, 1883
Black chalk on blued white Gillot paper
Sheet: 12 5/16 x 18 11/16 in. (31.3 x 47.5 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1955.1914


In this drawing executed on a special textured support, Monet translated one of his paintings into graphic form for the purpose of reproducing it in print. When photomechanically transferred to the zinc plate, the dense passages of looping and zigzagging lines, in combination with the vertical striations of the paper, would achieve a tonal effect. 

Berthe Morisot (1841–1895) 
Before a Yacht, 1875
Watercolor over graphite on cream wove paper
8 1/8 x 10 9/16 in. (20.7 x 26.8 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1955.1964


Morisot captures the transitory effects of nature in this virtuoso sheet. She suggests the rocking motion of the boats and the atmospheric bright sunlight that filters through the air.  

Camille Pissarro (1830–1903) 
Boulevard de Rochechouart, 1880
Pastel on beige wove paper
23 9/16 x 28 15/16 in. (59.9 x 73.5 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1996.5


Lively strokes of pastel in a multitude of colors create a transparent atmosphere that envelops figures and architecture in the flow of urban life. The high viewpoint plunges the viewer into this Parisian scene. 

Camille Pissarro (1830–1903) 
Peasant Women Weeding the Grass, c. 1894
Etching printed in blue, red, yellow, and black on cream laid paper
Sheet: 6 5/16 x 7 1/2 in. (16 x 19 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.91
 

In this late work — a proof impression with the artist’s own notations on the sheet — Pissarro renders simplified forms with strong outlines, color contrasts, and minimal detail. 

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919) 
Pinning the Hat: Second Plate, c. 1898
Lithograph printed in black, gray, orange, green, mustard, rust, and pink on cream laid paper
Sheet: 35 5/8 x 24 9/16 in. (90.5 x 62.3 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.99 


Renoir’s interest in printmaking late in his career coincided with the popularization of color lithography as a fine-art medium. For this print, Renoir worked with crayons directly on the lithographic stones, replicating the soft, powdery qualities of his pastels. 

Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) 
The Bathers: Large Plate, 1898
Lithograph printed in black, green, yellow-green, orange, gray, blue, and purple-blue on cream laid paper
Sheet: 19 x 24 13/16 in. (48.3 x 63.1 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.26


Working in collaboration with a professional printer, Cézanne reproduced the composition of one of his most famous paintings, Bathers at Rest (1876–77, The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia) in the widely circulating medium of color lithography. The distribution of blues, greens, and the cream tone of the paper creates a vivid sense of dappled light. 

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Old Women of Arles, from the Volpini Suite, 1889
Zincograph on yellow wove paper
Sheet: 17 1/4 x 21 3/8 in. (43.8 x 54.3 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.69


The five zincographs on bright yellow paper in this exhibition are part of Gauguin’s Volpini Suite, a series of prints based loosely on his works in other media. The suite takes its name from the owner of the café where Gauguin and other avant-garde artists staged their own exhibition in opposition to the state-sanctioned Exposition Universelle. This sheet is based almost directly on a painting made in Arles during Gauguin’s two-month stay with Vincent van Gogh. The yellow paper used throughout the suite may reflect Gauguin’s esteem for Van Gogh’s sunflowers and his famous yellow house. 

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Martinique Pastorals, from the Volpini Suite, 1889
Zincograph on yellow wove paper
Sheet: 17 ¼ x 21 5/8 in. (43.8 x 55 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.67


The graceful curving lines of the rolling hillsides, the heart-shaped leaves, and the women in native dress evoke a timeless utopia, far from the cares of the modern world. In this print and others inspired by his travels to Martinique in 1886, Gauguin focused on activities of daily life. 

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Human Misery, from the Volpini Suite, 1889
Zincograph printed in reddish-brown ink with borderlines in graphite on yellow wove paper
Sheet: 17 1/4 x 21 1/4 in. (43.9 x 53.9 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.61


The sorrowful woman, head in hands, and the male figure with his brow clouded by shadow call to mind the fallen Adam and Eve with the Tree of Knowledge behind them. 

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