Complete Checklist

The order of the works in the checklist corresponds loosely to their arrangement in the exhibition.

Complete Checklist (click for larger images)

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Joys of Brittany, from the Volpini Suite, 1889
Zincograph on yellow wove paper
Sheet: 17 ¼ x 21 1/4 in. (43.9 x 53.9 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.58


This image of girls in regional dress performing a traditional dance is characteristic of the bucolic themes of Gauguin’s work in Brittany. With the deliberate naiveté of his manner and the mask-like faces of the young dancers, the artist sought to evoke the primitive quality that he perceived in this region of northern France. 

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Breton Bathers, from the Volpini Suite, 1889
Zincograph on yellow wove paper
Sheet: 17 1/4 x 21 9/16 in. (43.8 x 54.7 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.59


Gauguin’s emphasis on sinuous outline, along with the flattened space and upturned perspective, reveals his interest in Japanese prints. The image was drawn on a grained zinc plate with both crayon and tusche (a greasy liquid used in lithography) applied with a brush. This method of printmaking yields fine gradations from light to dark, as is evident here. 

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Te Faruru (Here We Make Love), from Noa Noa, Winter 1893–94
Woodcut printed in black, light brown, yellow, and red on cream wove paper, mounted on beige cardboard
Sheet: 14 1/8 x 8 1/16 in. (35.9 x 20.5 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.70


This woodcut and three others in this exhibition are from a famous series known as Noa Noa (meaning “fragrant scent” in Tahitian), inspired by Gauguin’s stay in Tahiti from 1891 to 1893. The networks of white lines scratched into and gouged out of the hard surface of boxwood are characteristic of Gauguin’s woodcut technique. In this work, they impart a spectral quality to the entwined bodies of the lovers who emerge out of the darkness of night. 

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Te Atua (The Gods), from Noa Noa, Winter 1893–94
Woodcut printed in black, brown, orange, red, and green on cream wove paper, mounted on beige cardboard
Sheet: 8 1/8 x 14 1/16 in. (20.6 x 35.7 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.73


In this frieze-like composition, a Javanese Buddha figure at center is flanked at left by two Tahitian gods: Hina, goddess of the moon, and her son Fatu, god of the earth. Above the central figure, the artist’s deep gouging into the woodblock creates an aura of pulsating light. 

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Manao Tupapau (Watched by the Spirits of the Dead), from Noa Noa, Spring/summer 1894
Woodcut printed in yellow, orange, and black on beige wove paper
Sheet: 9 13/16 x 15 ¾ in. (25 x 40 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1981.152


In this reinterpretation of one of his most famous paintings, Gauguin presents a nude in a pose that suggests both birth and death. Two spirits in the background at right watch over her ominously. 

Paul Gauguin (1848–1903) 
Nave Nave Fenua (Delightful Land), from Noa Noa, Spring/summer 1894
Woodcut printed in black, dark orange, and yellow, with stencils in red, on beige wove paper
Sheet: 15 11/16 x 9 3/16 in. (39.3 x 23.3 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.72


The warm tones in this image of a figure in a lush landscape — a Polynesian Eve — are an exception to the prevalence of black throughout the series.  

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) 
The Englishman at the Moulin Rouge, 1892
Lithograph printed in black, green, gray, blue, orange-red, and yellow on cream laid paper
Sheet: 23 1/2 x 18 1/16 in. (59.7 x 45.9 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1968.17


To contemporary viewers, Toulouse-Lautrec’s inclusion of recognizable figures in his scenes of famous Parisian nightspots added another level of interest. The cropping of the image enhances the sense of immediacy by bringing the viewer into the conversation between the two protagonists. The man’s inclined posture and leering expression make clear the nature of their exchange. 

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) 
Miss Loïe Fuller, 1893
Lithograph printed in blue-gray, brown-aubergine, and yellow, touched with gold and silver powder on cream wove paper
Sheet: 15 1/16 x 11 1/16 in. (38.2 x 28 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.105


In this highly experimental lithograph, the sequential movement of Loïe Fuller’s famous stage performance in a voluminous transparent garment manipulated by long poles is captured in a swelling form that approaches abstraction. The addition of gold and silver dust to the print enhances the ethereal effect.  

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) 
Mademoiselle Marcelle Lender, Bust-Length, 1895
Lithograph printed in brown-green, yellow, red, dark pink, green, blue, gray, and yellow-green on cream wove paper
Sheet: 19 9/16 x 14 ¾ in (49.6 x 37.5 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1955.1442


This actress and dancer — a late-life passion of the artist’s — appears in many of his works, most famously dancing the bolero. The color harmonies that set off her vivid orange hair, pale powdered face, and décolletage in this close-up portrait reveal Lautrec’s tenderness for his subject. 

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901)
Frontispiece from Elles, 1896
Lithograph printed in olive green, blue, and orange on cream wove paper
20 11/16 x 15 13/16 in. (52.5 x 40.2 cm)
Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute, Williamstown, Massachusetts, 1962.107


A monument in modern printmaking, Toulouse-Lautrec’s Elles portfolio has been interpreted as a chronicle of the daily lives of lesbians involved in the worlds of prostitution and entertainment. The evocative image of a woman in nightdress letting down her hair, seen from behind, in combination with the presence of a man’s top hat introduces one of the themes.

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