Future Exhibitions

The Frick Collection is pleased to present the following future special exhibitions. Click on the images below for more information.

Men in Armor: El Greco and Pulzone Face to Face

August 5, 2014 to October 26, 2014

From 1570 to 1576, El Greco (1541–1614) worked in Rome, where he endeavored to establish himself as a portrait painter. The artist’s magnificent Vincenzo Anastagi ― a full-length standing portrait representing the largest of only three examples of his work in this genre to survive from the period ― offers a vital expression of his ambition and invention.

El Greco at The Frick Collection

November 4, 2014 to February 1, 2015

To celebrate the 400th anniversary of El Greco’s death, the Frick continues its 2014 focus on the artist, which began with Men in Armor: El Greco and Pulzone Face to Face (August 5–October 26, 2014), with an installation organized in conjunction with El Greco in New York, opening in November at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The Frick will unite its three remarkable El Greco paintings — Purification of the Temple and portraits of Vincenzo Anastagi and St. Jerome — showing them together, for the first time, on one wall of the East Gallery.

Masterpieces from the Scottish National Gallery

November 5, 2014 to February 1, 2015

In November, The Frick Collection will be the first venue to present a touring group of masterpieces from the National Galleries of Scotland. The ten paintings to be featured in New York ― among them a Botticelli never before on public view in the United States and John Singer Sargent’s iconic portrait of Lady Agnew ― will travel in 2015 with forty-five additional works to the de Young, Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco and the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth, Texas.

Coypel’s "Don Quixote" Tapestries: Illustrating a Spanish Novel in Eighteenth-Century France

February 25, 2015 to May 17, 2015

A masterpiece of comic fiction, Cervantes’s Don Quixote (fully titled The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha) enjoyed great popularity from the moment it was published, in two volumes, in 1605 and 1615, respectively. Reprints and translations spread across Europe, captivating the continental imagination with the escapades of the knight Don Quixote and his companion, Sancho Panza. The novel’s most celebrated episodes inspired a multitude of paintings, prints, and interiors.