Future Exhibitions

The Frick Collection is pleased to present the following future special exhibitions. Click on the images below for more information.

Coypel’s Don Quixote Tapestries: Illustrating a Spanish Novel in Eighteenth-Century France

February 25, 2015 to May 17, 2015

A masterpiece of comic fiction, Cervantes’s Don Quixote (fully titled The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha) enjoyed great popularity from the moment it was published, in two volumes, in 1605 and 1615. Reprints and translations spread across Europe, captivating the continental imagination with the escapades of the knight Don Quixote and his companion, Sancho Panza. The novel’s most celebrated episodes inspired a multitude of paintings, prints, and interiors.

Landscape Drawings in The Frick Collection

June 9, 2015 to September 13, 2015

In the summer of 2015, the Frick will present a selection of landscape drawings from its small but superb collection of works on paper. These sheets — many of which have rarely been on view — range in date from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century and include examples by Claude, Rembrandt, Corot, Rousseau, Whistler, and others.

Sir Frederic Leighton’s Flaming June

June 9, 2015 to September 6, 2015

Next summer, The Frick Collection will present Sir Frederic Leighton’s celebrated painting Flaming June from the Museo de Arte de Ponce in Puerto Rico. This monumental image of a sleeping woman in a brilliant orange gown is a masterpiece of British painting that has never been shown publicly in New York City. Indeed, as a collection highlight of its home institution, the work is seldom lent. The work will be installed on a wall in the center of the Oval Room, surrounded by the Frick’s four full-length portraits by James McNeill Whistler, an artist who was part of Leighton’s London circle.

Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action

October 7, 2015 to January 10, 2016

From about 1515 until his death, Andrea del Sarto (1486–1530) ran the most successful and productive workshop in Florence, not only leaving his native city richly decorated with his art but also greatly influencing the art produced in the remainder of the century. By 1700, however, Andrea’s reputation had declined, not to be revived until the publication of monographs by Sydney Freedberg and John Shearman in 1963 and 1965, respectively.