Google Art Project Videos

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  • Pierre-Auguste Renoir, "La Promenade"

    Google has worked with seventeen art museums, including The Frick Collection and three other US institutions (The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, in New York and, the Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian, in Washington D.C.), to create an online resource where visitors can explore museums from around the world, discover and view works of art at very powerful zoom levels, and even create and share their own virtual collections of masterpieces. The results of this global partnership can be explored at googleartproject.com.

  • Joseph Mallord William Turner, "The Harbor of Dieppe"

    Google has worked with seventeen art museums, including The Frick Collection and three other US institutions (The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, in New York and, the Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian, in Washington D.C.), to create an online resource where visitors can explore museums from around the world, discover and view works of art at very powerful zoom levels, and even create and share their own virtual collections of masterpieces. The results of this global partnership can be explored at googleartproject.com.

  • Hans Holbein, the Younger, "Sir Thomas More"

    Hans Holbein came to London from Switzerland in 1526, only a year before he dated this portrait. With a letter of introduction from the philosopher Erasmus, Holbein entered the rarefied circle of Sir Thomas More (1477/78-1535) and was soon living near him in Chelsea. More, in a letter back to Erasmus, spoke of Holbein as "a wonderful artist." Famed as a humanist scholar and author of the Utopia, More was a powerful statesman as well. By this time, he had already served Henry VIII as privy councillor for over a decade and became his lord chancellor in 1529. But More subsequently refused to subscribe to the Act of Supremacy, making the king head of the Church of England, and for this he was convicted of high treason and beheaded on July 6, 1535. A drawing by Holbein at Windsor Castle was the model for this painting, but the artist made numerous changes from it. As an evocation of one man's mind and character, this portrait has few equals. The gold S-S chain was an emblem of service to the king. The letters stand for the motto Souvent me souvien, or, Think of me often.

  • Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, "Self-Portrait"

    Of the many self-portraits Rembrandt painted over a lifetime, this is perhaps the greatest, not only for its poignant revelations of the self, but for his sure handling of paint. The initial effect on viewers is daunting, as though they are confronting an ill-tempered monarch. The strange costume he wears is timeless. In place of a crown, he wears a large velvet artist's beret. He holds a painter's stick as though it were a scepter. Yet this feeling of uneasy confrontation diminishes as we study the face. The wariness and impatience seem like a veil shadowing the man's real expression, which is blurred and scarred — by time, by sorrows, and by illness. Yet Rembrandt was only fifty-two in 1658 when he signed and dated this portrait. He was also a small man, but he portrayed his figure in monumental dimensions. It is almost as though he decided to pack his entire life into this image of himself, both what had gone before, and what lay ahead. The gigantic hands that loom before us are crucial to the portrait's effect, reminding us of Rembrandt's dependence on them.

  • Francisco de Goya y Lucientes, "The Forge"

    Google has worked with seventeen art museums, including The Frick Collection and three other US institutions (The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, in New York and, the Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian, in Washington D.C.), to create an online resource where visitors can explore museums from around the world, discover and view works of art at very powerful zoom levels, and even create and share their own virtual collections of masterpieces. The results of this global partnership can be explored at googleartproject.com.

  • Colin Bailey: Bellini’s "St. Francis in the Desert"

    A brief introduction to Giovanni Bellini's St. Francis in the Desert with Colin B. Bailey, Associate Director, and Peter Jay Sharp, Chief Curator of The Frick Collection.

  • Jean-Honoré Fragonard, "The Progress of Love"

    The intriguing story behind the commission, rejection, and rehousing of Fragonard’s paintings is brought to life by Colin B. Bailey, former Deputy Director and Peter Jay Sharp Chief Curator at the Frick (now Director of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco) in an updated video produced in 2013. Bailey leads viewers through the narrative of the Progress of Love, revealing the rich meanings imbedded in Fragonard’s paintings while also illuminating the artist’s exquisite technique.