Stunning and Unique Opportunity to View Allegories by Veronese Together - Veronese's Allegories: Virtue, Love, and Exploration in Renaissance Venice April 11, 2006, through July 16, 2006

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Exhibition Dates: 
Veronese’s Allegories: Virtue, Love, and Exploration in Renaissance Venice, April 11 through July 16, 2006
Painting of man in white garb stretching between two women in dresses

This exhibition—the first in this country since 1988 devoted to the work of the Venetian Renaissance artist Paolo Veronese (c. 1528–1588)—explores a particular aspect of the artist’s production by bringing together all five of the large-scale allegory paintings that are owned by American museums. The Frick Collection’s canvases, The Choice Between Virtue and Vice and Wisdom and Strength, inspired this dossier exhibition. Joining these masterworks are three others on special loan to the institution: Venus and Mars United by Love (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) and Allegory of Navigation with an Astrolabe and Allegory of Navigation with a Cross-Staff (Los Angeles County Museum of Art). Installed in the Oval Room, these grandly scaled theatrical canvases will surround the viewer with sumptuously costumed, sensuous figures and provide the opportunity to view closely the vibrant brushwork and vivid colors that are the hallmarks of Veronese’s mature style. Together, these five works will demonstrate Veronese’s masterful ability to convey messages and ideas through allegorical devices. Comparing these paintings for the first time in an exhibition also challenges long-held assumptions about the works’ dating, original commissions, and meanings. These are issues discussed in the exhibition’s accompanying illustrated full-color catalogue that traces the history of the paintings, the different interpretations of their iconography, and their place within the artist’s oeuvre. Veronese’s Allegories: Virtue, Love, and Exploration in Renaissance Venice is being coordinated for the Frick by Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow Xavier F. Salomon in conjunction with Associate Curator Denise Allen. Major funding for the presentation has been provided by The Christian Humann Foundation. Additional support has been provided by The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, Hester Diamond, The Helen Clay Frick Foundation, and the Fellows of The Frick Collection. The publication is made possible, in part, by Lawrence and Julie Salander.