The Frick Collection
Goya's Last Works
 
Special Exhibition: The Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain
 
:: The Japanese Palace of Augustus the Strong: Royal Ambition and Collecting Traditions in Dresden

:: The Arnhold Collection: From Dresden to New York

:: The Royal Porcelain Manufactory of Saxony,
c. 1710–13: “Red Porcelain” Production


:: The Royal Porcelain Manufactory of Saxony,
c. 1713–50: The New Medium, Court Culture, and European Tastes


:: The Royal Porcelain Manufactory of Saxony,
c. 1720-50: Chinoiserie Style, the Marchands- Merciers, and the Independent Decorators


The Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain, 1710–50
March 25, 2008, through June 29, 2008

Images from the Exhibition: First | Last

  Pantalone and Columbine, Meissen porcelain, c. 1740, modeled by Johann Joachim Kändler, 1736?38; 2006.582; H: 6 5/8 in. (17 cm.) Photo: Maggie Nimkin
 

Pantalone and Columbine, Meissen porcelain, c. 1740, modeled by Johann Joachim Kändler, 1736–38; 2006.582; H: 6 5/8 in. (17 cm.) Photo: Maggie Nimkin

Although Henry Arnhold has generally followed his parents’ collecting preference for vases and wares, in recent years he has acquired several significant figural groups made at Meissen. Beginning in the mid-1730s, the factory produced a series of figures from the Italian commedia dell’arte, most of which were modeled by the master sculptor Kändler and often based on prints. The group of Pantalone and Columbine has a theatrical quality, with the figures seemingly in centrifugal movement as Pantalone strides forward, his head turned toward Columbine, her hand on her hip and skirts flying. The group demonstrates the mastery achieved at the Meissen manufactory by the 1730s, not only in modeling but also in painting using a broad palette of overglaze enamel colors. Serving the demands of the king and the court, diplomatic gifts of Meissen porcelain brought this distinctive European porcelain to the attention of royal collectors and connoisseurs outside Saxony, and a marketplace developed as well, particularly in France, with the marchands-merciers ordering figures and wares to satisfy local tastes.

>>> First image from the exhibition.

The Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain, 1710–50, was organized for The Frick Collection by Director Anne L. Poulet and Maureen Cassidy-Geiger, guest curator of the exhibition. It is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, published by The Frick Collection in association with D Giles Unlimited, London, available in mid-April in the Museum Shop and online at shopfrick.org.

The exhibition is made possible, in part, by the generous support of the Arnhold Foundation.

 

 

The Arnhold Collection of Meissen Porcelain, 1710-50 Teapot, Meissen porcelain, c. 1725– 30, decoration attributed to Ignaz Preissler, c. 1725–30; 2001.468, photo: Maggie Nimkin Teapot and Cover, Meissen porcelain; c. 1725-30; h: 15.2 cm, without cover, to tip of handle h: 13.7 cm; The Arnhold Collection; photo: Maggie Nimkin Stand, Meissen porcelain, c. 1730, 2001.435, photo: Maggie NimkinCoffee Pot with Cover, Meissen stoneware, c. 1710–13, engraving executed in Dresden or Bohemia, 2001.449 (photo: Maggie Nimkin)