Fifth Avenue Garden

Fifth Avenue Garden

It is the warmth supplied by the color and life of the exterior gardens that gives The Frick Collection its residential ambience. In this respect it is unlike other museums of its size and scope in New York. Even fresh roses for the galleries and private luncheons are taken from the rose-cutting beds in summer, and herbs are grown to supply the kitchen for guests and staff. Set back from the sidewalk, behind the tall fence guarded by mythic iron griffins, the raised garden is presented like the stage of a theater, separating it from the busy world.

Magnolias

As a result of a decision of the Board of Trustees in 1939, three magnolias were selected for the Fifth Avenue garden. The two trees on the lower tier are Saucer Magnolias (Magnolia soulangeana) and the species on the upper tier by the flagpole is a Star Magnolia (Magnolia stellata). Considered to be some of the largest in the New York area, and certainly the most grand in the setting in which they are displayed, they maintain their balance by yearly pruning, which sustains their sprawling shape in proportion to the long limestone facade of The Frick Collection.