Link to video of Alan Wintermute lecture

Soon after Watteau's premature death in 1721, nearly three hundred of his paintings were engraved and published. Until recently, only about eighty of these paintings were generally thought to have survived. In just the last decade, however, a remarkable number of lost or previously unknown works have been identified, including the masterpiece La Surprise of 1718-19, now on long-term loan to The Frick Collection.

Link to video of David Solkin lecture

David H. Solkin discusses JMW Turner's work and love of art. David H. Solkin is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of the History of Art and Dean and Deputy Director at The Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

Link to video of Judy Sund lecture

Judy Sund of the Graduate Center of the City University of New York presents: Van Gogh's Peasants: The Essence of Earthiness. Van Gogh's portraits of Patience Escalier, one of which will be on loan to the Frick this fall, were part of his long-term project to capture the essence of the peasant. Inspired by literary descriptions as well as by the art of the past, he was intent on giving definitive form to a well-established type.

Link to video of Wendy Woon lecture

Today’s globalized culture demands creativity and continual innovation from individuals as well as institutions. How can museum education foster creativity, both for onsite visitors in our galleries and for online audiences? Examining the history of museum education reveals that we may build upon the values of the progressive education movement to inspire our practice and reinvigorate our strategic thinking about future programming and new initiatives. This is the fifth annual Samuel H.

Link to video of Colin B. Bailey and Charlotte Hale lecture

"Up and Down the Garden Path: Secrets of La Promenade Revealed," by Colin B. Bailey, The Frick Collection, and Charlotte Hale, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Saturday, May 5, 2012.  The Frick's Promenade is the most important Impressionist painting acquired by Henry Clay Frick. In researching this well-known work for the exhibition Renoir, Impressionism, and Full-Length Painting, many technical and documentary discoveries were made.

Link to video of Claudia Kryza-Gersch lecture

"Antico: A Pioneer of Renaissance Sculpture," by Claudia Kryza-Gersch, Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, May 2, 2012. Antico dedicated himself to reviving the forms and splendors of ancient sculpture. This lecture will explore the artist's pioneering role in establishing the bronze statuette as a new Renaissance genre; his innovative exploration of the classical bust and the female nude; and his invention of techniques for creating superbly finished versions of his bronzes that rival the technical achievements of the ancients.

Link to video of Aileen Ribeiro lecture

Alex Gordon Lecture in the History of Art: "Renoir and the Democracy of Fashion," by Aileen Ribeiro, Courtauld Institute of Art, London, March 28, 2012.  The period after the fall of the Second Empire in France saw huge developments in the fashion industry, not just in haute couture, but also in the greater availability of ready-to-wear clothes and in the emergence of Paris's shopping culture. More people than ever before expressed an interest in fashion trends, a phenomenon that was reflected in contemporary art and literature.

Link to video of Anne Distel lecture

"Renoir and the Woman of Paris," by Anne Distel, independent scholar, March 7, 2012. In characterizing Renoir's art, Cézanne once said that his old friend had "painted the woman of Paris." Cézanne's insight provides the point of departure for this lecture, which takes a closer look at Renoir's female figures.

Link to video of Gloria Groom lecture

"Fashioning the Mistress," by Gloria Groom, The Art Institute of Chicago, February 22, 2012.  Between 1866 and 1872 Renoir featured his mistress Lise Tréhot in more than thirty paintings, ranging from small and intimate genre scenes to the full-length canvases that he exhibited. Tréhot, wearing the most up-to-the-minute fashions, served as Renoir's calling card by advertising the artist as a painter of modern life, and especially of the fashionable Parisienne.

Link to video of Matthew Hargraves lecture

"Charles Ryskamp: A Life in Arts and Letters," by Matthew Hargraves, Yale Center for British Art, February 15, 2012.  Charles Ryskamp (1928–2010) served as the Director of The Frick Collection from 1987 to 1997. Under his leadership the Frick underwent a profound evolution and embarked on a new era of growth and innovation. In conjunction with the exhibition A Passion for Drawings, this lecture will explore the fascinating life and collecting interests of this remarkable scholar, teacher, connoisseur, and collector through the magnificent drawings he bequeathed to the Frick.