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Richard Sylla, Henry Kaufman Professor of Financial History, Stern School of Business, New York University, discusses the art of banking since the Medici. This lecture was part of the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, March 1, 2013 to 

David Alan Brown, Curator of Italian Painting, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., introduces how bankers can also be art collectors.

Ian Wardropper, Director, The Frick Collection and Inge Reist, Director, Center for the History of Collecting, Frick Art Reference Library, introduce the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, March 1, 2013 to 

During the early Renaissance, Piero della Francesca’s artistic talents were highly sought after by patrons across the Italian peninsula but nowhere more so than in his hometown of Borgo San Sepolcro.

Around 1555 the Duke of Alba commissioned three life-sized bronze busts by the great Italian Renaissance portraitist Leone Leoni: one of himself, one of the Hapsburg emperor Charles V, and one of the emperor’s son, Philip II of Spain. Though the busts depict sitters of different rank— a duke, an emperor, and a king—Leoni presents them almost identically, as armored warriors in the cause of the Counter Reformation. For more than a century the busts have adorned the Guard Chamber at Windsor Castle, surrounded by actual weaponry and armor.

When Vincent van Gogh moved from Paris to the South of France in 1888, the rural environs inspired him to revisit some of the central themes of his Dutch years, such as the changing seasons and the "labors of the fields." At the same time, his work was greatly influenced by his admiration for Japanese art and culture, coupled with his ambition to create distinctly modern pictures. This lecture discusses Van Gogh's Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier) in the context of

The Frick Collection's "St. Francis in the Desert" (c. 1475-78) by Giovanni Bellini ranks among the most important Italian Renaissance paintings in America. We invite the public to listen-in as a group of invited scholars discuss the painting from the perspective of the Franciscan order, which traces its origins to St. Francis of Assisi. Susannah Rutherglen, independent scholar and former Andrew W.

Soon after Watteau's premature death in 1721, nearly three hundred of his paintings were engraved and published. Until recently, only about eighty of these paintings were generally thought to have survived. In just the last decade, however, a remarkable number of lost or previously unknown works have been identified, including the masterpiece La Surprise of 1718-19, now on long-term loan to The Frick Collection.

David H. Solkin discusses JMW Turner's work and love of art. David H. Solkin is Walter H. Annenberg Professor of the History of Art and Dean and Deputy Director at The Courtauld Institute of Art, London.

Judy Sund of the Graduate Center of the City University of New York presents: Van Gogh's Peasants: The Essence of Earthiness. Van Gogh's portraits of Patience Escalier, one of which will be on loan to the Frick this fall, were part of his long-term project to capture the essence of the peasant. Inspired by literary descriptions as well as by the art of the past, he was intent on giving definitive form to a well-established type.

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