Images of Interest

A color drawing of a terra cotta vase filled with red, yellow, purple and red-and-white striped tulips with a small bird's nest containing three eggs propped on its base.

Dr. Charles A. Ryskamp (1928–2010), Director of The Frick Collection from 1987 to 1997 and, prior to that, of the Morgan Library & Museum, spent more than fifty years developing an extraordinary personal collection of European drawings. Passionate about collecting from a young age, his interest took a serious turn while he was a graduate student at Yale. He avidly collected books and manuscripts related to his studies, then branched into the visual arts when he purchased two Edward Lear drawings while he was a research fellow at Cambridge.

Drawing of a massive, multi-family townhouse with turrets, gables and round arches standing on the corner of a busy intersection in mid-century Manhattan.

One of the most popular series completed by the American illustrator Vernon Howe Bailey was his "Intimate Sketches of New York," which records the city during a period of dramatic growth—and change.

A black-and-white photograph of a Renaissance wall tomb set in a Venetian church.

Beginning in 1925, Helen Clay Frick hired the Italian photographers Mario Sansoni and Oreste Nesti to traverse Italy documenting in situ sculptures, paintings, and frescoes that other firms such as Anderson, Alinari, and Brogi had neglected to capture. On several occasions, staff of the Frick Art Reference Library requested photography of objects specifically related to works in The Frick Collection. - See more at: http://www.frick.org/photoarchive/discoveries/analog_facial_recognition_technology#sthash.lZxHZipQ.dpuf

A restored half-length painting of the Virgin Mary wearing a veil holding the Baby Jesus.

The third and final entry in a series of three blog posts focusing on conservation "interventions" as recorded in the holdings of the Frick Art Reference Library Photoarchive is this mysterious devotional image in the church of San Martino in Velletri, Italy.

A woman holding a young child and a small spaniel on her lap.

The second of a series of blog entries focusing on conservation “interventions” as recorded in the holdings of the Frick Art Reference Library Photoarchive is this problematic portrait of an engaging young woman, her son, and their serene spaniel attributed to Sir William Beechey (1753–1839).

Half-length portrait of a young woman dressed in a short-sleeved white dress and a shawl seated in a chair.

The first in a series of blog entries focusing on conservation “interventions” as recorded in the holdings of the Frick Art Reference Library Photoarchive is this elegant portrait of Mrs. William Bedlow Crosby attributed to Eliab Metcalf (1785‒1834), which underwent substantial restoration before 1940.

Corner of a room with a section of fresco depicting the head and shoulders of a young blond man.

In 1956, Thomas Hoving, the former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, traveled to Sansepolcro, Italy, to study and photograph works by Piero della Francesca (ca. 1415–1492), including a recently discovered fresco in the church of Santa Chiara (formerly Sant’Agostino).

A large room with fifty windows and a ceiling of exposed wooden rafters and beams.

The theme of this extensive fresco cycle—which is comprised of more than 300 scenes—is human life as regulated by the heavens.

Drawing of a cityscape with fortifications and a temple on a hill at right.

This detailed sketch, based on George Wheeler’s topographical drawing of 1667, documents the appearance of the Parthenon just a few years before Venetian forces shelled the Acropolis during the Republic’s struggle to take the city from the Ottomans in 1687.