November 4, 2014, through February 1, 2015

Goya’s Last Works

February 22, 2006 to May 14, 2006

Goya’s understated portrait of the woman known as María Martínez de Puga, acquired by Henry Clay Frick in 1914, was the inspiration for The Frick Collection’s special exhibition Goya’s Last Works. It was the first show in the United States to concentrate exclusively on the final phase of Goya’s long career — the years of the artist’s voluntary exile in Bordeaux from 1824 to 1828. Fifty-one examples of Goya’s final production were borrowed from public and private European and North American collections.

Veronese’s Allegories: Virtue, Love, and Exploration in Renaissance Venice

April 11, 2006 to July 16, 2006
The art of Paolo Veronese (1528–1588) is inextricably linked to the idea of opulence and splendor in Renaissance Venice. His paintings are grandiose visions of the richness and spectacle of sixteenth-century Venetian life. Crowded compositions with theatrical effects, in which groups of sumptuously dressed people re-enact religious and secular events, have become synonymous with Veronese’s oeuvre, and his dazzling and effective use of color has been praised and celebrated over the centuries.