Lectures

May 17, 2014
Joseph Rishel, The Gisela and Dennis Alter Senior Curator of European Painting & Sculpture before 1900 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art presents "The Philadelphia Story" during a two-day symposium titled 'The Americas Revealed, Collecting Colonial and Modern Latin American Art in the United States.' This event was organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection.

May 16, 2014 
Edward Sullivan, The Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of the History of Art at the Institute of Fine Arts and the Department of Art History at NYU, moderates a conversation with collectors Roberta and Richard Huber during a two-day symposium titled 'The Americas Revealed, Collecting Colonial and Modern Latin American Art in the United States.' This event was organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection.

May 16, 2014 
Ilona Katzew, Curator and Department Head, Latin American Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, presents her lecture "Sense of Mission, Aesthetic Sense: Why Build a Collection of Spanish Colonial Art?" during a two-day symposium titled 'The Americas Revealed, Collecting Colonial and Modern Latin American Art in the United States.' This event was organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection.

May 16, 2014
Ronda Kasl, Curator of Colonial Latin American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, presents her lecture, "An American Museum: Representing the Arts of Mexico at the Metropolitan Museum," during a two-day symposium titled 'The Americas Revealed, Collecting Colonial and Modern Latin American Art in the United States.' This event was organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection.

May 16, 2014 KEYNOTE ADDRESS
Edward Sullivan, The Helen Gould Sheppard Professor of the History of Art at the Institute of Fine Arts and the Department of Art History at NYU, opens a two-day symposium titled 'The Americas Revealed, Collecting Colonial and Modern Latin American Art in the United States.' This event was organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection.

May 16, 2014 WELCOME

Ian Wardropper, Director of The Frick Collection and Inge Reist, Director of the Center for the History of Collecting at the Frick Art Reference Library, introduce a two-day symposium titled 'The Americas Revealed, Collecting Colonial and Modern Latin American Art in the United States.' This event was organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection.

Much of art history and art education has been devoted to discovering meaning in historical works of art. Holly discusses an alternative critical path, wherein scholars need not always talk about what an artwork represents as much as what it presents. Works of art are about something far more magical, mysterious, and poetic than the transmittal of subject matter. The presence of an historical work of art in our contemporary visual world momentarily shifts the magnetic poles of what is seen and known. 

During the early sixteenth century, rulers and courtiers across northern Italy commissioned portraits that not only captured their appearance but also subtly alluded to their status and accomplishments.

Parmigianino's exquisite Schiava Turca (Turkish slave) is shrouded in mystery. Who is this woman whose elaborate, almost theatrical, costume inspired an early eighteenth-century writer to give the Renaissance beauty her fantastical name? In this lecture, the guest curator of the special exhibition The Poetry of Parmigianino's "Schiava Turca" will present a new interpretation of the work. Ng's new research suggests that the sitter likely held a special status as a poet in the court culture of Northern Italy. ―This lecture is made possible by the Robert H.

In the belief that personal circumstances play an important part in shaping the work of art historians, Jonathan Brown reflects on his career as a specialist in Hispanic art. He will also take a fresh look at Las Meninas (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid), discussing how it was understood by Velázquez's contemporaries at the court of Philip IV. The lecture coincides with the publication of Brown's In the Shadow of Velázquez: A Life in Art History.
 

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