Lectures

In the belief that personal circumstances play an important part in shaping the work of art historians, Jonathan Brown reflects on his career as a specialist in Hispanic art. He will also take a fresh look at Las Meninas (Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid), discussing how it was understood by Velázquez's contemporaries at the court of Philip IV. The lecture coincides with the publication of Brown's In the Shadow of Velázquez: A Life in Art History.
 

Houdon and Clodion are among the greatest French sculptors of the late eighteenth century, as well as the creators of works featured in the Frick's special exhibition Enlightenment and Beauty. As students in Rome in the 1760s, both were schooled in Greek and Roman culture and studied vast collections of antiquities. Yet what they absorbed from their training and the paths they chose to follow were quite different. This lecture will explore the sculptors' respective sources of inspiration and patronage. 

At the end of the sixteenth century Giambologna dominated the art of the small bronze, and his statuettes were highly prized by rulers and sophisticated collectors across Europe. In principle, the master’s models could be endlessly reproduced in bronze casts. Research undertaken for the upcoming exhibition Renaissance and Baroque Bronzes from the Hill Collection will show how and why replication became a major characteristic of the art of the small bronze and investigate whether multiplicity was considered a virtue.―This lecture is made possible by the Robert H.

This lecture presents an overview of the Hill Collection exhibition, which combines celebrated masterpieces with new discoveries in the field of bronzes. It traces the history of the bronze statuette from the late fifteenth to the eighteenth century in Italy and northern Europe. Particular emphasis is placed on the works of preeminent sculptors such as Giambologna, Tetrode, and Adriaen de Vries. 

―This lecture was made possible by the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation.
 

At the end of the nineteenth century, Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring sold for a pittance, an unknown work by an artist who was only beginning to achieve recognition. Today it is revered as a great masterpiece, so famous that it is recognizable by its title alone, with the name of its maker being almost superfluous. This lecture examines the reasons this image resonates so profoundly with contemporary audiences.
 

October 3, 2013
The Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection celebrates the inauguration of its Fellows Program with a lecture Start Again: Collections and Memory by Edmund de Waal, author of The Hare with Amber Eyes: A Hidden Inheritance.

This lecture examines David d'Angers's monumental commissions of the 1820s and 1830s in relation to the Bourbon Restoration, the July Monarchy, and the politics of public memory. It also will consider the sculptor's relationship to the period's architects and their collaborative work on the transformation of urban space in Paris.
 

Dutch genre paintings of the seventeenth century show individuals in domestic settings going about their daily activities, such as letter writing, eating and drinking, or making music. Many of these seemingly straightforward scenes, however, contain moral lessons that are difficult for us to decipher today.

Noted art critic and historian Hans den Hartog Jager interviewed Dutch photographer Rineke Dijkstra, known for her remarkable oeuvre of large-scale portraits, which were featured in a retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum last year. The artist discussed the relationship of contemporary photography and her own work to paintings by such artists as Rembrandt and Vermeer. 

―This program was made possible through the generous support of the Drue Heinz Trust.
 

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