Lectures

Charles Sebag-Montefiore, Independent Scholar and Trustee of The National Gallery in London, discusses the Barings, a dynasty of art collectors. This lecture was part of the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, March 1, 2013 to 

Jeannie Chapel, Independent Scholar from London, discusess collector Thomas Hope. This lecture was part of the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, March 1, 2013 to 

Daniella Ben-Arie, Independent Scholar from New York, discusses Henry Hope, the patron and collector. This lecture was part of the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, March 1, 2013 to 

Inge Reist, Director of Center for the History of Collecting at the Frick Art Reference Library, welcomes Day 2 of the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, March 1, 2013 to 

Dale Kent, Professorial Fellow, School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne, and Professor Emerita, Department of History, University of California, Riverside, discusses the rise of collecting the Renaissance Florence art of Cosimo de' Medici and his sons. This lecture was part of the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, 

Richard Sylla, Henry Kaufman Professor of Financial History, Stern School of Business, New York University, discusses the art of banking since the Medici. This lecture was part of the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, March 1, 2013 to 

David Alan Brown, Curator of Italian Painting, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., introduces how bankers can also be art collectors.

Ian Wardropper, Director, The Frick Collection and Inge Reist, Director, Center for the History of Collecting, Frick Art Reference Library, introduce the symposium "Money for the Most Exquisite Things: Bankers and Collecting from the Medici to the Rockefellers," organized by the Center for the History of Collecting at The Frick Collection, March 1, 2013 to 

During the early Renaissance, Piero della Francesca’s artistic talents were highly sought after by patrons across the Italian peninsula but nowhere more so than in his hometown of Borgo San Sepolcro.

Around 1555 the Duke of Alba commissioned three life-sized bronze busts by the great Italian Renaissance portraitist Leone Leoni: one of himself, one of the Hapsburg emperor Charles V, and one of the emperor’s son, Philip II of Spain. Though the busts depict sitters of different rank— a duke, an emperor, and a king—Leoni presents them almost identically, as armored warriors in the cause of the Counter Reformation. For more than a century the busts have adorned the Guard Chamber at Windsor Castle, surrounded by actual weaponry and armor.

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