All Blogs

  • Summer 2016

    Director Ian Wardropper discusses the evolution of the collection, including recent acquisitions.

  • Know Your Meme

    Interior of the Artist's Apartment, made sometime after 1910 by the American painter and watercolorist Walter Gay, shows a narrow view of a sitting area in Walter and his wife Matilda's Paris apartment at 11 Rue de l'Université, where the couple had moved in May 1909.

  • Selections from the William H. Schab Gift

    Dr. Charles A. Ryskamp (1928–2010), Director of The Frick Collection from 1987 to 1997 and, prior to that, of the Morgan Library & Museum, spent more than fifty years developing an extraordinary personal collection of European drawings. Passionate about collecting from a young age, his interest took a serious turn while he was a graduate student at Yale.

  • Winter 2016

    The Director looks ahead at the coming months and discusses an innovative education collaboration with the Ghetto Film School.

  • Van Dyck's Portrait of Cardinal Bentivoglio

    Van Dyck’s portrait of Cardinal Bentivoglio has left Italy, travelling to the U.S. for the first time, where it is on view at the Frick in the Van Dyck: The Anatomy of Portraiture (March 2 through June 5, 2016). This great work is discussed by Xavier F. Salomon, who considers it among the most important loans to the exhibition (and his favorite work in the show).

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  • Delius Buys A Gauguin

    Last week I was transcribing a recording of my interview with the painter, Noel Forster (1932–2007), for a forthcoming monograph on him. Noel recalls his first stay in London, in Lupus Street, Pimlico.

  • A Cosgrave as a Copley

    In 1943, Brooklyn artist Esta Cosgrave (née Esther Flack) (ca. 1900–1952) adopted a quirky style of painting modern-day likenesses in 18th- and 19th–century costumes and poses.

  • Fall 2015

    In 1916, Henry Clay Frick converted his private office at his home on Fifth Avenue into a gallery for the collection of Limoges enamels that he had purchased from the estate of J. Pierpont Morgan for the then-staggering sum of $1,157,500. What was so compelling about these delicate, jewel-like objects that Frick paid such a high price and was willing to sacrifice his sanctuary for their...

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  • Van Dyck Portraits Return to the Galleries

    Monumental Works Offer a Preview of Next Year’s Exhibition

    October 29, 2015

  • Leighton, Whistler, and Aestheticism

    In 1877, James McNeill Whistler sued John Ruskin for libel. Earlier that year, the critic had accused the artist of “flinging a pot of paint in the public’s face” in response to one of his pictures then on view at London’s newly established Grosvenor Gallery.

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