10th Anniversary Events


Symposium

Made in the USA: Collecting American Art during the Long Nineteenth Century
Friday, March 3, and Saturday, March 4
Presented by the Center for the History of Collecting, Frick Art Reference Library

This two-day symposium focuses on collections of American art formed during the late eighteenth century through the early twentieth century and concludes with a conversation with Alice Walton, the greatest living collector of American art and the founder of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Presentations not only examine the tastes and activities of private collectors and dealers, but also explore specific areas of collecting, such as Connecticut collectors, patrons and collectors of American Pre-Raphaelite art, collections of private clubs, and the trade in faked Colonial portraits.

Tickets for both days are $50 ($35 for members); single-day tickets are $30 ($25 for members).

Program: Made in the USA


Lecture

Acts to Follow: Three Centuries of Tastemakers and Collectors
Tuesday, April 11

Inge Reist, Director of the Center for the History of Collecting, delivers a lecture on the scholars, collectors, art dealers, and philosophers who have stimulated significant shifts in taste. The lecture will be followed by a moderated audience discussion and a reception to celebrate the Center’s 10th anniversary.

The event is free with registration. Click here or call 212.547.6894 to register. 

 

 

Symposium

Sculpture Collecting and Display, 1600–2000
Friday, May 19, and Saturday, May 20
Presented by the Center for the History of Collecting, Frick Art Reference Library

This two-day symposium will showcase how approaches to collecting and displaying sculpture have varied and changed over the centuries, from the Kunskammer of late Renaissance princes, to the sculpture galleries of the eighteenth century, to garden sculpture ensembles and, finally to the challenges of displaying sculpture in public museums. Renowned art historian Malcolm Baker will offer the keynote address, which will be followed by a roster of distinguished speakers from Europe and the United States. The symposium is made possible through the support of the Robert H. Smith Family Foundation.

Tickets for both days are $50 ($35 for members); single-day tickets are $30 ($25 for members).
 

Program: Sculpture Collecting and Display, 1600-2000


Thomas Cole (1801–1848), View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm — The Oxbow, 1836. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. Russell Sage, 1908 (08.228). Image © The Metropolitan Museum of Art