Jeongho Park

Link to video of Jeongho Park lecture
El Greco’s Vincenzo Anastagi  is one of three portraits from the painter’s formative Italian period. Jeongho Park explores the significance of this important work in the context of El Greco’s career and the implications of Henry Clay Frick's aquisition of this painting for his art collection. 
 
Jeongho Park is the Curatorial Research Associate at the Blanton Museum of Art, University of Texas, Austin, and former Anne L. Poulet Fellow at The Frick Collection. 
Link to introductory video for the exhibition 'Men in Armor: El Greco and Pulzone Face to Face'

Jeongho Park, Anne L. Poulet Curatorial Fellow at The Frick Collection, introduces the exhibition Men in Armor: El Greco and Pulzone Face to Face, on view in the East Gallery through October 26, 2014.

oil painting of man, from waist up, in black and gold armor with helmet on table
Men in Armor: El Greco and Pulzone Face to FaceAugust 5, 2014 to October 26, 2014

From 1570 to 1576, El Greco (1541–1614) worked in Rome, where he endeavored to establish himself as a portrait painter. The artist’s magnificent Vincenzo Anastagi ― a full-length standing portrait representing the largest of only three examples of his work in this genre to survive from the period ― offers a vital expression of his ambition and invention.