2016

Exhibitions presented at The Frick Collection during 2016.

photo of white porcelain dish decorated with large red dragon and cup-like objects
Porcelain, No Simple Matter: Arlene Shechet and the Arnhold CollectionMay 24, 2016 to April 2, 2017

A collaboration with New York−based sculptor Arlene Shechet, this exhibition explored the complex history of making, collecting, and displaying porcelain. About one hundred eighteenth-century pieces produced by the Royal Meissen Manufactory, many from the promised gift of Henry H. Arnhold, were juxtaposed with sixteen of Shechet’s own works.

 

Delve into Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s The Three Soldiers through this interactive online exhibition created by The Frick Collection for Bruegel / Unseen Masterpieces, an initiative of the Google Cultural Institute to bring together great works by Bruegel from collections around the world. To learn more, visit the Google Cultural Institute's project page

painting with six figures including an angel surrounded by naked and clothed figures
Cagnacci’s “Repentant Magdalene”: An Italian Baroque Masterpiece from the Norton Simon MuseumOctober 25, 2016 to January 22, 2017

Guido Cagnacci was one of the most eccentric painters of seventeenth-century Italy, infamous for the unconventionality of both his art and his lifestyle. Born in Romagna in 1601, he lived and worked in his native region as well as in Venice, concluding his career in imperial Vienna. His works, mostly religious in subject, are known for their unabashed, often unsettling eroticism, and his biography is no less intriguing.

Detail of Gouthiere gilt-bronze pot-pourri vase with head of a swan
Pierre Gouthière: Virtuoso Gilder at the French CourtNovember 16, 2016 to February 19, 2017

The Frick Collection presented the first exhibition on Pierre Gouthière (1732–1813), the great French bronze chaser and gilder who worked for Louis XV and Louis XVI. The exhibition shed new light on the artist’s production, life, and workshop through the presentation of twenty-two objects from public and private collections. Attributed with certainty to Gouthière, these works include clocks, vases, firedogs, wall lights, and mounts for Chinese porcelain and hardstone vases. The exhibition was organized by Charlotte Vignon, Curator of Decorative Arts, The Frick Collection. Based on new art historical and technical research, the exhibition and catalogue promise to transform our understanding of one of the greatest artists of eighteenth-century France.

painting of soldiers standing and seated against wall, circa 1711
Watteau’s Soldiers: Scenes of Military Life in Eighteenth-Century FranceJuly 12, 2016 to October 2, 2016

It would be difficult to think of an artist further removed from the muck and misery of war than Jean-Antoine Watteau (1684–1721), who is known as a painter of amorous aristocrats and melancholy actors. And yet, early in his career, Watteau painted a number of scenes of military life. They were produced during one of the darkest chapters of France’s history, the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–14), but the martial glory on which most military painters trained their gaze held no interest for Watteau.

Half length oil portrait of a woman with a blue dress wearing pearls, set against a brown background
Van Dyck: The Anatomy of PortraitureMarch 2, 2016 to June 5, 2016

Anthony van Dyck (1599–1641), one of the most celebrated and influential portraitists of all time, enjoyed an international career that took him from his native Flanders to Italy, France, and, ultimately, the court of Charles I in London. Van Dyck’s supremely elegant manner and convincing evocation of a sitter’s inner life — whether real or imagined — made him the favorite portraitist of many of the most powerful and interesting figures of the seventeenth century.

Green and purple porcelain ship on bronze base
From Sèvres to Fifth Avenue: French Porcelain at The Frick CollectionApril 28, 2015 to April 24, 2016

Between 1916 and 1918, Henry Clay Frick purchased several important pieces of porcelain to decorate his New York mansion. Made at Sèvres, the preeminent eighteenth-century French porcelain manufactory, the objects — including vases, potpourris, jugs and basins, plates, a tea service, and a table—were displayed throughout Frick’s residence.

Red chalk profile portrait study of Julius Caesar
Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in ActionOctober 7, 2015 to January 10, 2016

From about 1515 until his death, Andrea del Sarto (1486–1530) ran the most successful and productive workshop in Florence, not only leaving his native city richly decorated with his art but also greatly influencing the art produced in the remainder of the century. By 1700, however, Andrea’s reputation had declined, not to be revived until the publication of monographs by Sydney Freedberg and John Shearman in 1963 and 1965, respectively.