Mapping Provenance

Works of art seldom rest in one place, instead migrating around the world on the winds of taste and commerce. Digital tools allow us to visualize the journeys of works in the Frick’s permanent collection like never before, mapping each stop on their trajectories through time and space.

  • Mapping Provenance: Bellini's "St. Francis in the Desert"

    Giovanni Bellini’s St. Francis in the Desert (ca. 1476–78) is one of the Frick’s most beloved works of art, but there was a time when it could not find a buyer. Explore the ups and downs of the art market through an interactive map charting the panel’s peregrinations, from quattrocento Venice to its temporary home at Frick Madison.
  • Mapping Provenance: Fragonard's Progress of Love

    What happens to a work of art when it is rejected by its patron? Explore an interactive map to discover how the canvases in Jean-Honoré Fragonard’s Progress of Love series were scorned by a royal mistress, rolled up for twenty years in the Louvre, and more than tripled in number on their way from eighteenth-century France to the fourth floor of Frick Madison.
  • Mapping Provenance: Holbein's "Sir Thomas More"

    The journey of an artwork is rarely a smooth one, and what we know about the ownership history of Holbein’s Sir Thomas More (1527) is notable for its gaps. Explore an interactive map tracing the fragmentary path of this panel from Tudor England to the second floor of Frick Madison.
  • Mapping Provenance: Vermeer's "Mistress and Maid"

    Digital tools allow us to visualize the trajectory of an artwork through time and space. Explore an interactive map tracing the meandering path of Johannes Vermeer’s Mistress and Maid (ca. 1666–67) around the globe, from Vermeer’s studio in Delft in the seventeenth century to the second floor of Frick Madison in 2021.