All Objects

  • Study for a ceiling fresco

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences, ca. 1730–31
    Oil on canvas
    21 7/8 × 28 3/8 in. (55.5 × 72 cm)
    Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, Lisbon
    © Direção-Geral do Património Cultural / Arquivo de Documentação Fotográfica (DGPC/ADF); photo Luisa Oliveira

     

    This is one of three surviving sketches by Tiepolo for Palazzo Archinto, here reunited for the first time. When Tiepolo painted this one, he had no idea what the quadratura around the fresco was going to look like; he therefore left his figures hovering in a cloudy sky, surrounded by an area of brown ocher color. The allegorical figures that populate this sketch are portrayed under the protection of Minerva and Apollo. At top left is Saturn, winged and with his scythe to signify the timeless nature of the arts and sciences. Each of the female figures in the painting is associated with an art or a science. Painting, brandishing brush and palette, is at center right. To her left is Music, seated with a viola. The woman with a closed book and the other one with a pen and an open book, are possibly History or Literature and Poetry, respectively. Further to the left is Sculpture, leaning over a marble bust and holding a chisel. To the left, on another cloud, are Arithmetic (in her left hand, a scroll inscribed with numbers) and Architecture (with a pendulum). Behind them, to the left, are Astronomy, measuring the heavens with a compass, and Dialectic in a helmet with white and black feathers and a half-moon on her forehead, and holding a double-edged dagger. At the right, a beautiful male figure with multicolored wings and holding an object that has been variously identified as a lens, magnifying glass, or mirror, may be an allegory referring to color and vision.

  • Drawing of allegorical figures.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Study for Four Female Figures, 1730–31
    Pen, brown ink, and black chalk, on white paper
    11 3/8 × 13 3/8 in. (288 × 340 mm)
    Civico Museo Sartorio, Trieste

     

    For his fresco cycles, Tiepolo executed a number of preparatory drawings that study compositional solutions for his figurative groups. This is the only extant pen sketch for the Archinto cycle. Here Tiepolo studied the central group of figures for the Triumph of the Arts and Sciences, focusing on the allegorical figures of Literature (or History), Painting, and Sculpture.

  • Drawing of a female head

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Study of Female Head (recto); Study of Foreshortened Head (verso), 1730–31
    Black and white chalk on gray-white paper, recto framed in pen and brown ink
    11 1/4 × 8 1/4 in. (285 × 210 mm)
    Finnish National Gallery, Sinebrychoff Art Museum, Helsinki
    Finnish National Gallery / Jenni Nurminen

     

    The study on the recto, likely drawn from a model, was used for the central figure of Painting in the Triumph of the Arts and Sciences. The focus is on the soft shadows created by the light coming from the left and on the simple line of the contour of the figure's oval face. The study on the verso (upside down) is probably for the bust that Tiepolo placed next to the allegory of Sculpture in the final fresco.

  • Photograph of a frescoed ceiling.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences, ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 1
    Page from unbound book
    17 5/8 × 23 1/2 in. (448 × 598 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    As can be seen from the pre-war photographs, there are several differences between the Lisbon sketch and the final fresco. The addition of the quadratura in the final ceiling meant that the figures were repositioned in relation to the fictive architecture. In the final fresco, Saturn is shown seated on the tympanum of a building; the putto seated under Painting was given wooden squares rather than a mask; and the two putti in the sketch at bottom left and right were eliminated.

  • Photograph of a fresco depicting allegorical figures.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences, ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 2
    Page from unbound book
    17 5/8 × 23 1/2 in. (448 × 598 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

     
  • Photograph of a fresco depicting allegorical figures.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences, ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 3
    Page from unbound book
    17 5/8 × 23 1/2 in. (448 × 598 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

     
  • Photograph of a fresco depicting allegorical figures.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    6 3/4 × 4 3/8 in. (172 × 112 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    6 3/4 × 4 3/8 in. (172 × 112 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Detail photograph of a fresco depicting allegorical figures.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    4 3/8 × 6 3/4 in. (112 × 172 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Detail photograph of a fresco depicting allegorical figures.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    4 3/8 × 6 3/4 in. (112 × 172 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Detail photograph of a fresco depicting a winged allegorical figure.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    6 3/4 × 4 3/8 in. (172 × 112 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Detail photograph of a fresco depicting allegorical figures.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of the Arts and Sciences (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    4 3/8 × 6 3/4 in. (112 × 172 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • oil painting of Perseus and Andromeda riding Pegasus through the sky

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Perseus and Andromeda, ca. 1730–31
    Oil on canvas
    20 3/8 x 16 in. (51.8 x 40.6 cm)
    The Frick Collection, New York
    © The Frick Collection

     

    Tiepolo took liberties with Ovid's Metamorphoses in showing Perseus riding the winged horse Pegasus instead of flying by way of a pair of winged sandals, as in the original text. At the bottom is the rock on which Andromeda was chained, with remnants of her shackles still attached to it. In the sea below is the dying monster, with Perseus's lance — which has shattered upon piercing its head — above its eye. To the left, and behind the rock, are five Nereids, crying, presumably for the death of the monster, as well as from the humiliation suffered because of Cassiopeia's comments. In the sky, Jupiter, accompanied by his eagle, welcomes a supplicating female figure seated on a cloud, presumably Cassiopeia herself, asking for her daughter to be spared. At the heart of the composition is Perseus, on Pegasus, flying through the sky and seizing Andromeda, who is naked and wearing her broken manacles. Around them is a glory of Cupids, celebrating the love between Perseus and Andromeda. Throughout the composition, small stars are visible. Most of the mythological figures in this scene — Perseus, Andromeda, Cassiopeia, Cepheus, and Pegasus — were later transformed into constellations.

  • Photograph of a frescoed ceiling.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Perseus and Andromeda, ca. 1730-31 (destroyed 1943)
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 4
    Page from unbound book
    23 1/2 × 17 5/8 in. (598 × 448 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    The overall configuration of the Perseus and Andromeda fresco in Palazzo Archinto was very similar to the one shown in the sketch, which was likely presented to Carlo Archinto for approval. There were, however, some significant changes. The position of the proper right arm of the central Nereid was altered, and two additional figures were added in the final fresco. To the left of Cassiopeia, a crowned male figure was included — Cepheus — and the god Mercury was added below Jupiter.

  • Photograph of an room with a frescoed ceiling.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Perseus and Andromeda (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    4 3/8 × 6 3/4 in. (112 × 172 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Detail photograph of a ceiling fresco.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Perseus and Andromeda (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    4 3/8 × 6 3/4 in. (112 × 172 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Study for a fresco depicting scenes from the story of Apollo and Phaeton

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Apollo and Phaëton, ca. 1730–31
    Oil on canvas
    25 1/4 × 18 3/4 in. (64.1 × 47.6 cm)
    Los Angeles County Museum of Art

     

    Tiepolo set this scene in the dwelling of the Sun, described by Ovid as decorated with high columns and resplendent in golden light. Two winged figures close the composition at top and bottom. Above is Saturn, the god of Time, swooping down from the sky, holding his scythe. On the ground, fast asleep, is Morpheus, god of slumber, accompanied by another winged, sleeping figure. To the right are the Four Seasons, precisely described in Ovid's text: Spring (Flora) with her flowers; Summer (Ceres), naked and with ears of wheat; Autumn (Bacchus) with grapes; and Winter with his frozen, white beard. Below them are two putti and sunflowers, plants usually associated with the sun and linked to the myth of Clytie, known for her love of the Sun god. On the opposite side, the Sun's impetuous horses are regimented by the Hours, who are tethering them to Apollo's chariot. The moment shown by Tiepolo is the granting of the request, after Apollo has tried, in vain, to dissuade his son from the dangerous enterprise. Holding a torch while standing in front of Apollo, Phaëton points with a rod toward the zodiac, where Scorpio is clearly visible, between Libra and Sagittarius. Bathed in golden light and crowned with laurel, Apollo holds a small urn, presumably the magical ointment used to protect his son's face from the rays of the sun.

  • Photograph of a frescoed ceiling.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Apollo and Phaëton, ca. 1730-31 (destroyed 1943)
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 9
    Page from unbound book
    23 1/2 × 17 5/8 in. (598 × 448 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    The compositions of the final Archinto fresco and that of the Los Angeles sketch are almost identical. The positions of Autumn and Winter vary slightly, with the two figures closer together in the fresco. The depiction of sunflowers is also altered, as is the position of Phaëton's proper right arm. He holds the whip at a different angle.

  • Pen and ink drawing of allegorical figures.

    School of Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Apollo and Phaëton, ca. 1730–40
    Pen and brown ink over a black chalk sketch, brown watercolor and white lead on gray-green paper
    15 1/4 × 20 1/2 in. (386 × 521 mm)
    The British Museum, London
    © Trustees of the British Museum

     

    Traditionally attributed to Tiepolo and linked to his frescoes at Palazzo Archinto, this drawing seems to be an independent work not directly related to the Milanese fresco cycle or the Los Angeles sketch. The quality of the drawing is inferior to that usually achieved by Tiepolo. It may have been executed by Francesco Zugno, who worked alongside Tiepolo on the Rerum Italicarum Scriptores in the early 1730s. The large size of the drawing suggests it may have been intended for the collectors' market.

  • Painting of mythical scene of Apollo and Phaethon.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Apollo and Phaëton, ca. 1730–35
    Oil on canvas
    26 3/4 × 20 7/8 in. (68 × 53 cm)
    Gemäldegalerie der Akademie der bildenden Künst, Vienna
    Gemäldegalerie der Akademie der bildenden Künste Wien

     

    This painting depicts the same episode shown in the Archinto ceiling. Here, the principal grouping of Apollo and his son Phaëton appears at the top left. Apollo stands on a cloud, while Phaëton kneels in front of him, holding a torch. Above them, Time flies inexorably. On the right are the Four Seasons, not dissimilar in composition from the Archinto fresco. Below them, the Hours tether two horses to the gold chariot of the Sun. A younger winged figure appears at the top, pouring water out of a vase and extinguishing a torch. This is probably Lucifer, the morning star. To the right, between Time and Autumn, the arch of the zodiac is portrayed, with the symbols of Libra, Scorpio, and Sagittarius. The handling of this sketch is freer and more assertive than in the Los Angeles sketch. And this canvas does not seem to be preparatory for a ceiling, as it shows the scene frontally instead of in perspective from below.

  • Study for a fresco cycle depicting Apollo and Phaethon.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Apollo and Phaëton, ca. 1735–40
    Oil on canvas
    38 5/8 × 29 in. (98.1 × 73.6 cm)
    The Bowes Museum, Barnard Castle, County Durham, United Kingdom

     

    This painting depicts the same episode that Tiepolo frescoed on one of the five ceilings of Palazzo Archinto. Apollo, draped in red, holds a small vase with the ointment that was to protect his son's face while driving the chariot of the Sun. A Cupid flies into the composition, bringing Apollo his lyre. In the background, to the right, are the Four Seasons. Below, the Hours and a Cupid tie the horses to the gold chariot, though here, with its large wheels, it is closer to a country buggy. In the distant background, to the right, is Morpheus, asleep, with a bat flying overhead. While in the other renderings of this scene, Tiepolo showed Phaëton asking his father to drive the chariot of the Sun, in this painting, Phaëton is on his way. He steps forward, naked, barely covered by a yellow drape, holding a torch. He clasps his father's right hand, as he kisses it in a tender gesture of gratitude. Time is between the figures of father and son and powerfully separates them. In the other two paintings, the scene is serene, but here Tiepolo adds a dramatic, somewhat tragic tone, redolent of looming death. The size of the canvas prompts the question of whether it can be considered a modello at all. It may simply have been an independent painting. The sketchy effect and the roughed-out areas of paint suggest that it was left unfinished by Tiepolo.

  • Photograph of a frescoed ceiling.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Nobility, ca. 1730–31
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 7
    Page from unbound book
    23 1/2 × 17 5/8 in. (598 × 448 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Photograph of a frescoed ceiling.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Juno, Venus, and Fortune, ca. 1730–31
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 8
    Page from unbound book
    23 1/2 × 17 5/8 in. (598 × 448 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Frontispiece of a book with illustration of two coats of arms being carried by eagles and putti.

    Dedication Page for Filippo Argelati's Le Ode di Anacreonte (Milan, 1731)
    Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense, Milan
    Su concessione del Ministero dei beni e delle attività culturali e del turismo; photo Mauro Ranzani

     

    This book was produced as a wedding gift to Filippo Archinto and Giulia Borromeo, who married on April 22, 1731. Filippo Argelati, the Archinto family librarian, chose to dedicate to the couple some "amorous compositions": the Odes by Anacreon. The preface of the book opens with the two families' coats of arms (Archinto on the left and Borromeo on the right). Antonio Gantelmi also published a short poem for the new couple, dedicating it to Carlo Archinto and Giovanni Borromeo, the fathers of the groom and bride.

  • Frontispiece of a book.

    Frontispiece for Antonio Gantelmi's Epitalamio per le nozze di sue eccellenze li signori Don Filippo Archinto e Donna Giulia Contessa Borromeo (Milan, 1731)
    Biblioteca Nazionale Braidense, Milan Su concessione del Ministero dei beni e delle attività culturali e del turismo; photo Mauro Ranzani

     

    Antonio Gantelmi published this short poem as a wedding gift to Filippo Archinto and Giulia Borromeo, who married on April 22, 1731. He dedicated it to Carlo Archinto and Giovanni Borromeo, the fathers of the groom and bride. 

  • Photograph of the facade of Palazzo Archinto

    Vincenzo Aragozzini (act. early to mid-20th century)
    Facade of Palazzo Archinto, 1934
    11 3/8 × 9 1/8 in. (289 × 232 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    For the most part, the exterior of Palazzo Archinto appears today as it did in the seventeenth-century. The somber architecture, with the main portal on Via Olmetto, is typical of the design of seventeenth-century Milanese palazzos.

  • Photograph of an interior courtyard.

    Unknown photographer
    First courtyard of Palazzo Archinto, ca. 1920
    5 × 11 5/8 in. (126 × 294 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Photograph of an interior courtyard.

    Vincenzo Aragozzini (act. early to mid-20th century)
    First courtyard of Palazzo Archinto, 1934
    9 1/8 × 11 3/8 in. (232 × 288 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    Palazzo Archinto has two large consecutive internal courtyards, around which its rooms are arranged. The main staircase, which leads to the piano nobile, is located to the side of this first courtyard.

  • Photograph of a courtyard, as seen from a second story.

    Vincenzo Aragozzini (act. early to mid-20th century)
    View of the courtyards of Palazzo Archinto, 1934
    9 1/8 × 11 3/8 in. (231 × 288 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    The second courtyard leads to the internal garden. A series of courtyards culminating in a garden was a common feature of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Milanese palazzos. The balcony over the second courtyard's arcade connected the family's rooms to the library.

  • A print depicting two allegorical female figures, one seated and one standing, adjacent a monument to Saint Mark.

    Francesco Zucchi (1672–1750) after Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Allegory of Peace and Justice Paying Homage to the Lion of St. Mark
    From Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores (Milan, 1723–51), frontispiece for vol. 12
    Columbia University Libraries, Columbia University in the City of New York

     

    Muratori's Rerum Italicarum Scriptores is a twenty-five volume compilation of Italian historical sources, most of which date to the Middle Ages.  Among those from whom the Società Palatina secured  financial support for the project was the Republic of Venice, which through the agency of its ambassador in Milan, Giacomo Busenello, sponsored volume 12, on Venetian history. Tiepolo designed the frontispiece, in which allegorical figures of Justice (with a sword and weight scale) and Peace (with a laurel branch) flank the lion of St. Mark, symbol of Venice. Other volumes of the Rerum Italicarum Scriptores were supported by the republics of Genoa and Lucca.

  • Drawing from a fresco cycle.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Presentation of a Decapitated Head and the Keys to the City
    Drawn for Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores,
    ca. 1725–30
    Black chalk reworked with traces of red chalk on white paper
    3 × 6 1/8 in. (75 × 155 mm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

  • Drawing of a procession of men holding torches, a banner, and a crucifix.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    The Italian Flagellant Movement
    Drawn for Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores, ca. 1725–30
    Black chalk on white paper
    3 1/8 × 6 1/2 in. (80 × 166 mm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

  • Drawing of several figures arranged around a table.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    The Assassination of Count Ghiazolo in Rimini in 1326
    Drawn for Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores,
    ca. 1725–30
    Black chalk on white paper
    2 7/8 × 6 1/8 in. (74 × 157 mm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

  • Drawing of a coronation scene.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    The Coronation of Henry VII in Milan in 1311
    Drawn for Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores,
    ca. 1725–30
    Black chalk on white paper
    3 × 6 1/8 in. (77 × 156 mm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

     
  • Frontispiece of a book with two columns of text and and image at the top of the page.

    Francesco Zucchi (1672–1750) after Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    The Coronation of Henry VII in Milan in 1311
    From Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores (Milan, 1723–51), vol. 16
    Columbia University Libraries, Columbia University in the City of New York
    Columbia University Libraries, Columbia University in the City of New York

     

    Tiepolo provided delicate designs for a number of engravings by Francesco Zucchi for many of the volumes of Muratori's Rerum Italicarum Scriptores. One of the headpieces of volume 16 relates to the text it introduces: an anonymous account of the history of Milan. Tiepolo depicted the coronation of Emperor Henry VII as King of Italy, which took place in Milan on January 6, 1311. The original drawing for this print is also shown in the exhibition.

  • Drawing of soldiers storming a battlement.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Siege of a City
    Drawn for Carlo Sigonio, Opera Omnia, 1730–31
    Black chalk on white paper
    2 7/8 × 6 in. (73 × 151 mm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

     
  • Drawing of two men and two carts being pulled by oxen.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    The Exchange of Ox Carts between Parma and Cremona in 1281
    Drawn for Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores,
    ca. 1725–30
    Black chalk on white paper
    3 × 6 in. (76 × 154 mm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
     © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

     
  • Frontispiece of a book.

    Francesco Zucchi (1672–1750) after Francesco Zugno (1709–1787)
    Alberico Archinto and an Allegory of the Catholic Faith
    From Carlo Sigonio, Opera Omnia (Milan, 1732–37), headpiece for vol. 5
    Columbia University Libraries, Columbia University in the City of New York

     

    Carlo's son, Alberico Archinto, pursued an ecclesiastical career and was among the scholars who annotated parts of the Rerum Italicarum Scriptores and supported the Società Palatina. The fifth volume of Sigonio's Opera Omnia was dedicated to Alberico, whose portrait, accompanied by an allegory of the Catholic Faith, appears on the headpiece. This was designed by Tiepolo's pupil and collaborator, Francesco Zugno, whose original drawings for this print are at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, and the Castello Sforzesco, Milan.

  • Drawing of an army surrounding a walled city.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Siege of a City
    Drawn for Ludovico Antonio Muratori, Rerum Italicarum Scriptores,
    ca. 1725–30
    Black chalk on white paper
    4 3/8 × 7 1/2 in. (112 × 192 mm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

     

    The preparatory drawings Tiepolo made to accompany the medieval texts collected by Muratori in Rerum Italicarum Scriptores represent scenes from Italian history. Many of the events depicted cannot be precisely identified, however, and on more than one occasion, the drawings are used multiple times, to illustrate different events.

  • Drawing of a victorious emperor surrounded by his army, horsemen, and musicians.

    Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of a Roman Emperor
    Drawn for Carlo Sigonio, Opera Omnia, 1730–31
    Black chalk reworked with traces of red chalk on white paper
    4 3/8 × 7 1/2 in. (110 × 191 mm)
    The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
    © The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Art Resource, NY

     
  • Frontispiece of book featuring an image of a triumphant ruler, surrounded by an army, horsemen, and musicians.

    Francesco Zucchi (1672–1750) after Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Triumph of a Roman Emperor
    From Carlo Sigonio, Opera Omnia (Milan, 1732–37), headpiece for vol. 1
    Columbia University Libraries, Columbia University in the City of New York

     

    One of the publications produced by the Società Palatina was the six-volume Opera Omnia, the collected works of the sixteenth-century historian Carlo Sigonio. The headpiece for the first volume — representing the triumph of an ancient Roman emperor as he is carried by his generals to a tent — is based on a drawing by Tiepolo.

  • Print of an allegorical female figure presenting a book to a bust of a man.

    Francesco Zucchi (1672–1750) after Giambattista Tiepolo (1696–1770)
    Italy Presenting the Volume to Charles VI
    From Francesco Mediobarbo Birago, Imperatorum Romanorum Numismata (Milan, 1730), frontispiece
    Mount Holyoke College Archives and Special Collections, South Hadley

     

    The Imperatorum Romanorum Numismata, dedicated to Emperor Charles VI in Vienna, was the last of the Società Palatina volumes with which Tiepolo was involved. Its subject is the study made by Francesco Mediobarbo, Count of Birago, of two hundred thirty-five ancient Roman coins, dating from the age of Pompey to the age of Emperor Heraclius. The frontispiece features the personification of Italy presenting the book to the emperor, shown in the form of a bust against a background of ancient ruins. Fame, above, plays a trumpet decorated with the Hapsburg's double-headed eagle, while Time is fast asleep in the lower part. The print is signed prominently at the bottom by both Tiepolo and the printer Francesco Zucchi, no doubt because of its imperial dedication.

  • Photograph of a frescoed ceiling.

    Vittorio Maria Bigari (1692–1776)
    Bacchus and Ariadne, ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 10
    Page of unbound book
    23 1/2 × 17 5/8 in. (598 × 448 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    This triumphal scene of Bacchus and Ariadne in a chariot drawn by panthers celebrates the encounter between the god of wine and the beautiful Ariadne, who had been abandoned on the island of Naxos by Theseus. The fresco likely referred to the wedding, in 1731, of Filippo Archinto and Giulia Borromeo.

  • Photograph of a fresco depicting allegorical figures.

    Vittorio Maria Bigari (1692–1776)
    Truth Unveiled by Time, ca. 1730–31 
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    6 3/4 × 4 3/8 in. (172 × 112 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    Depicting Truth unveiled by Time on clouds in the sky, Bigari's fresco for the ceiling of a small room is the only intact painting that survived the 1943 bombing of the palazzo. The fresco was detached from the ruins of the palazzo in 1960–66 and is still preserved there.

  • Detail photograph of a ceiling fresco.

    Vittorio Maria Bigari (1692–1776)
    Apotheosis of Romulus (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer, 1940
    4 3/8 × 6 3/4 in. (112 × 172 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    This photograph taken before the 1943 bombing shows a detail of Bigari's Apotheosis of Romulus. Bigari depicted the mythical founder of Rome being presented to Jupiter by Mars. Around them are the gods who favored Rome, as well as those who opposed it. 

  • Detail photograph of a ceiling fresco.

    Vittorio Maria Bigari (1692–1776)
    Apotheosis of Romulus (detail), ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    Unknown photographer
    4 3/8 × 6 3/4 in. (112 × 172 cm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    This photograph taken before the 1943 bombing shows a detail of Bigari's Apotheosis of Romulus. Romulus's wife, Hersilia, is brought to Olympus on a rainbow by Iris, through the intercession of Juno.

  • Photograph of a frescoed ceiling.

    Vittorio Maria Bigari (1692–1776)
    Apotheosis of Romulus, ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl. 5
    Page from unbound book
    17 5/8 × 23 1/2 in. (448 × 598 cm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    A large volume dedicated to the Archinto frescoes was compiled by Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese and published in 1897. Included is a brief text on Tiepolo by Centelli and a series of fifty black-and-white illustrations. The Centelli and Molfese volume attributes all the Archinto frescoes to Tiepolo, but we now know that the Bolognese painter Vittorio Maria Bigari (1692–1776) painted three of them. The Apotheosis of Romulus, Bigari's largest fresco in the palazzo, decorated one of the rooms on the piano nobile.

  • Photograph of a frescoed ceiling.

    Vittorio Maria Bigari (1692–1776)
    Apotheosis of Romulus, ca. 1730–31 (destroyed 1943)
    From Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese, Gli affreschi di G.B. Tiepolo raccolti da Gerardo Molfese con uno studio di Attilio Centelli (Turin, 1897), pl.6
    Page from unbound book
    17 5/8 × 23 1/2 in. (448 × 598 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    A large volume dedicated to the Archinto frescoes was compiled by Attilio Centelli and Gerardo Molfese and published in 1897. Included is a brief text on Tiepolo by Centelli and a series of fifty black-and-white illustrations. The Centelli and Molfese volume attributes all the Archinto frescoes to Tiepolo, but we now know that the Bolognese painter Vittorio Maria Bigari (1692–1776) painted three of them. The Apotheosis of Romulus, Bigari's largest fresco in the palazzo, decorated one of the rooms on the piano nobile.

  • Photograph of a damaged building.

    Unknown photographer
    Palazzo Archinto after bombing in August 1943, 1948
    6 7/8 × 9 1/4 in. (175 × 235 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     

    After the bombing in August 1943, Palazzo Archinto remained abandoned and in ruins for a number of years. It was rebuilt between 1955 and 1967. Though the interiors of the palazzo were devastated by the bombing, photographs taken in the 1940s show that the overall architectural structure remained intact.

  • Photograph of a damaged building and tower.

    Unknown photographer
    Palazzo Archinto after bombing in August 1943, 1948
    9 1/4 × 6 7/8 in. (235 × 174 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Photograph of the interior of a damaged building.

    Antonio Paoletti (1881–1946)
    Palazzo Archinto after bombing in August 1943; interior spaces, 1945
    9 1/4 × 6 7/8 in. (235 × 175 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Photograph of the interior of a damaged building.

    Antonio Paoletti (1881–1946)
    Palazzo Archinto after bombing in August 1943; interior spaces, 1945
    9 1/4 × 6 7/8 in. (235 × 175 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano

     
  • Photograph of the exterior of a damaged building.

    Unknown photographer
    Palazzo Archinto after bombing in August 1943, 1948
    6 3/4 × 9 1/4 in. (173 × 235 mm)
    Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli, Milan
    su autorizzazione dell'Azienda di Servizi alla Persona Golgi-Redaelli di Milano